We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Cybersecurity.

best-cyber-security-news

Unveiling the Impact Of PII on Cybersecurity

By Tom Seest

What Is PII and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

At BestCybersecurityNews, we help entrepreneurs, solopreneurs, young learners, and seniors learn more about cybersecurity.

Personally identifiable information, or PII for short, is a term cybersecurity professionals use to describe any data that could potentially identify an individual.
Personal information (PII) refers to anything from a name and credit card number to address and medical records. Depending on the potential harm it could cause, this PII can be classified as sensitive or non-sensitive.

What Is PII and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

What Is PII and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

Uncovering the Secrets of PII in Cybersecurity

In cybersecurity, personally identifiable information (PII) refers to any data that could be used to identify an individual. This could include things like a person’s name, social security number, address, and more; it can even include biometric details like fingerprints or facial images.
Protecting personally identifiable information (PII) is an essential aspect of cybersecurity, especially for businesses that store sensitive customer data in their systems. Without adequate safeguards, criminals could gain access to this data and commit identity theft or financial crimes.
A useful approach for defining Personal Identifying Information (PII) is to consider the types of data you use or are exposed to on a daily basis. For instance, when purchasing a phone or product online, PII such as your name, address, and credit card number may be provided. This data helps confirm your identity, monitor purchases, and access certain services.
To accurately define Personal Information (PII), create an inventory of all data processed, stored, or received. This could range from website contact forms to database backups and contractor sites.
Your organization should evaluate what personally identifiable information (PII) it currently has and whether or not there are still legitimate business objectives for collecting it. Furthermore, create a strategy to eliminate unnecessary collection and use of this data.
There are a number of laws that specify how companies must manage PII, such as the EU’s GDPR regulation and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). These regulations have stringent requirements with significant fines for violators.
Private Individual Information (PII) can be classified as either sensitive or non-sensitive, with different implications for an organization. Sensitive PII has more value and could result in severe financial losses or identity theft if misused.
The two primary security controls that can be utilized to safeguard Personal Identifying Information (PII) are encryption and redacting. These two steps are essential in preventing sensitive data from leaving the network or being stolen, as well as helping keep unencrypted PII from being sent to third parties or shared with other organizations.

Uncovering the Secrets of PII in Cybersecurity

Uncovering the Secrets of PII in Cybersecurity

How Can Sensitive Data Be Protected?

Sensitive data refers to private information that must remain secure from unauthorized access. This includes both physical and digital details, such as financial or health records, that could cause irreparable harm if exposed to a third party.
Data breaches can have devastating results for those affected, as well as the organization that suffered data loss. These could include fines, legal action, reputational damage, and economic losses.
There are a number of cybersecurity laws that protect sensitive information, such as the North Carolina Identity Theft Protection Act and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). These regulations aim to keep this type of data private and prevent its disclosure or misuse without authorization.
These laws also help guarantee organizations protect their customers’ privacy. They specify various types of sensitive data that organizations must safeguard, as well as provide guidelines on what can be disclosed.
In many cases, sensitive information directly related to an individual is available online, such as their name, social security number, and date of birth. This data can be highly beneficial to cybercriminals or other malicious actors by enabling them to create fraudulent documents, steal a person’s identity, and commit other crimes.
PHI (Personal Identifying Information) is one of the most prevalent categories of sensitive data and is highly valued for protecting it from unauthorized disclosure. Furthermore, it’s heavily regulated by various privacy laws around the world, which prohibit organizations from collecting or using this type of information.
Organizations must identify and implement robust data management and cybersecurity practices that block unauthorized access. They also need the capacity to swiftly address a breach in order to minimize its effects.
Sensitive data must be prioritized and managed appropriately, leading to improved risk assessments and decision-making on how best to safeguard it. By creating a classification policy based on sensitivity, organizations can assess potential threats and determine the most suitable measures for protection.
The CIA trinity of confidentiality, integrity, and availability is a useful framework for classifying sensitive data. This will guide the classification process while guaranteeing that companies have adequate safeguards in place to protect sensitive information and meet their regulatory obligations.

How Can Sensitive Data Be Protected?

How Can Sensitive Data Be Protected?

What Is Non-Sensitive Data Compared to Personally Identifiable Information?

Non-sensitive data refers to information that can be transmitted without harming an individual. This type of information is typically gathered from public records, phone books, websites, and corporate directories and could include zip codes, dates of birth, gender, and religion.
Data can be either directly identifiable or pseudonymous. Pseudonymous data may be utilized to target users based on their behavior or identify individuals by virtue of a unique combination of characteristics.
Sensitive data refers to any information which could cause harm if released. It’s often regulated by laws like the Privacy Act, HIPAA, GLBA, and CCPA.
Data usually resides on the computers of a company or organization, as well as in their systems and databases. It’s usually confidential and accessible only by authorized personnel.
Some examples of sensitive data include trade secrets, confidential employee data, business plans, and financial info. These types of records could be valuable to a hacker or competitor who could use it to gain an edge in competition and potentially steal from you.
Another example of sensitive data is health and medical information. This data is governed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and includes details such as an individual’s health status, treatments, and care.
Protected Health Information, commonly abbreviated as PHI, is the domain of this data.
Data classification in cybersecurity is an essential step in determining how best to safeguard proprietary information. Different pieces of data have varying levels of sensitivity, necessitating different levels of protection and remediation.
A helpful method for determining whether a piece of data is sensitive is to consider its confidentiality, integrity, and availability (CIA). If exposing this data would have an adverse impact on your organization or customers, then it should be kept secure using encrypted technology.
Cybercriminals are targeting organizations that store, process, and manage personal information. This could pose a variety of cyber risks and exposures, such as theft, fraud, and identity theft.

What Is Non-Sensitive Data Compared to Personally Identifiable Information?

What Is Non-Sensitive Data Compared to Personally Identifiable Information?

How Can a Data Breach Impact You?

Data breaches occur when sensitive company information is stolen without authorization, typically by cybercriminals circumventing security measures like firewalls and antivirus software.
Based on the type of data and its value, it may appear in various places and be utilized for various purposes. Unfortunately, personally identifiable information (PII) often ends up on the dark web, where criminals purchase it to use for illicit activities.
When data breaches occur, companies must act quickly to minimize any potential risks or damages. Ideally, they’ll have a comprehensive breach response plan that addresses all aspects of the business – forensics, legal, information security, human resources, communications, operations, and investor relations.
As the initial step, notify all customers affected by the breach as soon as possible. This can be done by sending a letter or email that includes all pertinent details about the breach, your response, and how individuals can protect themselves. It’s also wise to post updates on your website so consumers always have access to up-to-date info.
Notifying consumers as soon as possible after a data breach can help limit the damage to their trust and reputation. Many jurisdictions have passed data breach notification laws requiring companies to notify customers of an incident and take other steps to repair any injuries.
Once informed, consumers should change their passwords for any accounts that could be vulnerable and those sharing the same login credentials. They should also contact their banks and credit card providers to report the incident.
Data breaches can be costly, both in terms of direct expenses such as investigation and remediation, as well as intangible damages like reputation loss. They may also result in fines and litigation.
Finally, a successful data breach response necessitates collaboration among several teams, with the exact scope and order of tasks depending on the attack and organization structure. These teams need access to various information, such as forensic tools and software, plus resources for analysis and restoration of compromised systems.

How Can a Data Breach Impact You?

How Can a Data Breach Impact You?

Please share this post with your friends, family, or business associates who may encounter cybersecurity attacks.