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Unlock Your Ideal Cyber Security Career

By Tom Seest

What Is Your Perfect Cyber Security Role?

At BestCybersecurityNews, we help entrepreneurs, solopreneurs, young learners, and seniors learn more about cybersecurity.

Cybersecurity is one of the fastest-growing and most in-demand fields. It also offers numerous benefits, such as excellent career progression, high salaries, and expansion prospects.
Selecting the ideal cyber security role requires consideration of your background, interests and personality. Selecting an ideal cybersecurity job will enable you to get started in this field and develop your career within it.

What Is Your Perfect Cyber Security Role?

What Is Your Perfect Cyber Security Role?

Ready to Build and Protect? Discover the World of Security Architecture & Engineering

As a security architect, your job is to design and implement systems that safeguard your organization’s computer systems from digital threats. Working closely with engineers and other cybersecurity specialists, you ensure the safety of sensitive company data.
For this job, it’s necessary to possess strong technical abilities in areas such as network and database security, application security, etc. These competencies can be acquired through education, certifications, hands-on experience, and training courses.
A bachelor’s degree is the minimum educational requirement to become a security architect, though many professionals in this field hold master’s degrees. Additional certifications, training programs and cybersecurity bootcamps can further hone your expertise and open doors to higher-level roles with greater earning potential.
Security architects are senior information technology professionals responsible for planning and implementing computer and network security systems within an organization. Typically, they hold bachelor’s degrees in computer science or related fields along with years of industry experience, plus a deep comprehension of computer and network security practices, risk management tactics, and architecture.
They may possess a background in information technology, business, or law. As a result, they possess the expertise needed to anticipate cyber attacks and take steps to prevent them from occurring.
Architects engage in strategic thinking, designing frameworks that thwart hackers at every possible entry point. They create policies, standards, procedures, and documentation to guarantee all aspects of an organization’s system work together to prevent security breaches.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), security architects earned a median salary of USD 122,634 in May 2021. This wage is higher than that of computer and information systems managers – roles lateral to security architects’ roles – who earned about USD 159,000 that same year.
As a security architect, your job can be both rewarding and challenging as you must be able to think quickly on your feet and resolve issues promptly. Furthermore, you must communicate effectively with other IT workers and team members while still making decisions regarding which practices, technologies, and policies are best suited for your organization.

Ready to Build and Protect? Discover the World of Security Architecture & Engineering

Ready to Build and Protect? Discover the World of Security Architecture & Engineering

Ready to Join the Elite? Discover the World of Red Teaming

Red teamers collaborate with clients to assess their cyber security. They may use simulated attacks to detect vulnerabilities and offer suggestions on how to patch them. Furthermore, red teamers can conduct a penetration test in order to demonstrate compliance with security protocols.
A red team assessment is designed to simulate a real-life attacker and utilize tactics, techniques, and tools in order to gain access to target systems or data. This type of testing is more aggressive than regular penetration testing, which typically only identifies a few vulnerabilities.
The initial step in any red team engagement is to fully comprehend the client’s objectives and scope. Doing this guarantees that the engagement remains focused on achieving these targets rather than wasting time and resources on something which won’t deliver desired results.
They will then create an adversary emulation plan based on their comprehension of the business, sector, and threat model. This helps them identify realistic threats to their client’s operations and construct a simulated attack likely to achieve its goals.
After a successful simulated attack, the red teamer will produce a report outlining their findings, outlining how it was conducted and any vulnerabilities found. This allows the company to address these weaknesses before an actual hacker discovers them.
For those with the right qualifications and skills, this role can be a lucrative career option. According to recent salary surveys, the average pay for Red Teamers with 5-10 years of experience is $116,000.
As a Red Teamer, you will be part of an offensive cybersecurity team that strives to safeguard sensitive information from malicious cyberattacks. Your task will involve simulating various attacks against your client – from initial lateral movement and phishing attempts to full domain takeover – in order to gain valuable insights.
As a Red Teamer, you must possess an attacker-like mentality and be willing to take risks that are not always in the company’s best interests. This is essential as it allows for insight into things from an attacker’s perspective.

Ready to Join the Elite? Discover the World of Red Teaming

Ready to Join the Elite? Discover the World of Red Teaming

Ready to Take on Cyber Threats as a Malware Analyst?

Malware analysts are responsible for detecting and eliminating malicious code from computer systems and networks. They collaborate with other security specialists in order to safeguard businesses against cyberattacks.
Malware analysts face a challenging yet rewarding role. Utilizing their computer programming expertise, these professionals use machine learning algorithms to detect malicious software and develop tools and techniques for keeping computers secure in the future. Malware analyst roles offer both satisfaction and responsibility!
Malware analysts are responsible for recognizing and examining various kinds of viruses, Trojan horses, worms, adware, bots and ransomware. Based on this knowledge they create tools and methods to detect, identify and prevent these threats.
Malware analysts require a strong background in both cybersecurity and computer programming to be successful in their jobs. This is because malware often contains complex instructions that may be difficult to decipher without the right tools.
As a malware analyst, you typically need a bachelor’s degree in computer science or an related field. An advanced degree such as a master’s in cybersecurity or computer engineering is desirable but not always necessary for this position.
Another essential requirement for this career is experience with malware detection and reverse engineering. This knowledge helps you comprehend how malware is created, as well as how to prevent future outbreaks.
Furthermore, you need a comprehensive understanding of security technologies and how to utilize them together with other software to create effective detection and response systems. Ongoing education is essential for this career since malware evolves constantly, and the threat landscape continues to shift.
Malware analysts need special skill sets in order to recognize, disassemble, and analyze codes that cause malicious programs to execute. This necessitates knowledge of various languages, particularly low-level assembly language.
Assembler code is the last human-readable programming language, and it’s quite difficult to decipher and interpret. That’s why you need to know how to break it down into simpler components that humans can comprehend.

Ready to Take on Cyber Threats as a Malware Analyst?

Ready to Take on Cyber Threats as a Malware Analyst?

What Does It Take to Be a Successful Threat Hunter?

Threat hunting is a type of cybersecurity analysis that uses data gathered by security monitoring and event management tools to detect potential threats. The objective is to capture and neutralize any malicious actors that might try to circumvent traditional security controls like firewalls or intrusion detection systems.
Cyber threat hunters are essential members of a security operations center (SOC) team, responsible for preventing, detecting and responding to threats before they have an impact on an organization’s network or infrastructure. Typically employed by large organizations that face high levels of cyber attacks, these professionals provide invaluable services.
The threat hunter role entails recognizing advanced threats that might bypass traditional security controls. These can come from insider and outside sources and account for up to 10% of cyber attacks. In order to detect these risks effectively, threat hunters need access to high-quality security data and intelligence.
Threat hunters need to be adept at creating hypotheses and then selecting how to gather and analyze data in order to prove or disprove them. This may involve identifying security data sources, crafting a strategy for collecting and evaluating this information and implementing that plan.
A successful threat hunter is an experienced investigator with the capacity to detect suspicious behavior in organizations’ IT environments. Additionally, they must possess a profound comprehension of today’s threat landscape, including malware techniques and attack methodologies.
Threat hunting is an integral part of any company’s cyber security strategy. By detecting and eliminating detection gaps, strengthening defenses, and reducing data overload, threat hunters help guarantee that a company’s security operations run efficiently.
Threat hunters use their expertise in the cyber security landscape and creative problem-solving skillsets to detect threats within corporate environments. They conduct structured and unstructured hunting to detect any patterns on the network that could indicate an unauthorized or malicious actor. Furthermore, they must communicate their findings and suggestions to the Security Operations Center team (SOC) while eliminating redundant manual errors during detection and analysis processes.

What Does It Take to Be a Successful Threat Hunter?

What Does It Take to Be a Successful Threat Hunter?

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