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Uncovering the Dark Side Of Cybersecurity: Crimeware

By Tom Seest

What Is Crimeware and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

At BestCybersecurityNews, we help entrepreneurs, solopreneurs, young learners, and seniors learn more about cybersecurity.

Crimeware is a term for malicious software programs designed to automate cybercrime with the aim of identity theft and financial gain.
They can steal passwords and redirect a user’s browser to an impostor website controlled by the criminal. Furthermore, they have the capacity to grant remote access to applications.

What Is Crimeware and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

What Is Crimeware and How Does It Impact Cybersecurity?

What are Viruses and How Do They Impact Cybersecurity?

Viruses are malicious pieces of code that spread from device to device, similar to biological viruses that make people sick. They can damage computers or steal information, so it’s essential to safeguard them against these threats.
Historically, viruses have been distributed through floppy disks or infected e-mail attachments. They can range in complexity from simple text files to programs that delete files on your hard drive.
Though many viruses have become “legacy threats,” they remain dangerous. Not only can they wreak havoc on your computer, but they may also spread infection to other devices through the same attack.
They can cause a range of issues on your system, such as slow performance, operating system crashes, and program malfunctions. Furthermore, they have the potential to install back doors that grant them remote access and control over your computer or monitor web traffic.
Another prevalent type of malware is a Trojan, which is deceptive software that appears to do one thing but actually performs an entirely different, potentially hazardous function. Trojans are commonly used for phishing for user credentials or accessing confidential data and can even launch DDoS attacks against other computers.
Trojans may be difficult to detect, but they can be blocked by a combination of anti-virus and other security measures. Modern endpoint protection systems employ traditional antivirus, next-generation antivirus (NGAV), behavioral analytics, and other defenses that will help stop most trojans.
Cybercriminals employ Trojans for a variety of purposes, from hacking into websites and stealing credentials to destroying computers (e.g., Stuxnet), which was used in Iran’s nuclear facilities attack. Other common uses for Trojans include spying on users and taking their banking information.

What are Viruses and How Do They Impact Cybersecurity?

What are Viruses and How Do They Impact Cybersecurity?

Uncovering the Threat of Trojans

Trojans are malicious programs that appear legitimate but actually contain malware. They have the capability of taking over computers, disrupting network performance, and stealing information.
Social engineering and fake alerts are common tactics cyber-attackers use to tempt unsuspecting users into clicking on malicious files or links. Fortunately, there are numerous cybersecurity programs that can detect Trojans and other forms of malware trying to infiltrate your devices.
A Trojan’s primary objective is to steal private information such as credit card numbers or personal details from you. In some cases, it can even alter your computer’s system settings in order to grant hackers full administrative access to the machine.
To accomplish this, a Trojan downloads a small file known as a loader. Once it is run, it connects to a server where it installs all of the malicious code necessary for its success.
Furthermore, some trojans are designed to create a network of zombie computers that can be utilized in subsequent attacks. These zombies then participate in botnet attacks, which target large networks of machines.
These malicious Trojans typically install cryptojackers (malicious software that mines cryptocurrency) or ransomware. Once these viruses encrypt files or block access to a device, they demand money from victims in exchange for their data.
Criminals also employ trojans to collect email addresses from users’ computers. They then utilize this data for spamming and phishing attacks.
Another type of Trojan is a spyware program that tracks your activities and reports back to its attacker. It may take screenshots or log keystrokes, for example.
Some Trojans are designed to steal your passwords, so make sure none are on your system. Furthermore, watch for remote access Trojans, which could take advantage of login credentials to online banking and credit card sites.

Uncovering the Threat of Trojans

Uncovering the Threat of Trojans

Uncovering the Secrets of Rootkits

Rootkits are malicious software packages used to install malware onto an infected system and undermine its cyber security. Hackers often employ these intrusive instruments in order to access private information or launch denial-of-service (DoS) attacks against a target system.
Rootkits come in many forms, including application and kernel-mode rootkits. Applications rootkits affect programs like Microsoft Office or Notepad and alter how they function; they’re hard to detect because the affected software continues running normally.
Kernel mode rootkits are more dangerous, infecting the operating system’s kernel and controlling computer memory, hardware, and processes. Furthermore, they have the potential to interfere with antivirus or other cyber security solutions installed on a machine.
The best way to protect yourself against this type of malware is to use an effective anti-malware program and keep your system and other programs up to date. Updates are important because they contain security fixes that address any vulnerabilities hackers might discover in your system.
Another crucial step is ongoing user education. This should include learning how to spot phishing attacks, how to avoid clicking on links that lead to suspicious sites or downloading apps from untrustful sources, and more.
These steps will help prevent a rootkit from installing on your device and gaining access to your data. Furthermore, they may shield you from other types of crimeware like ransomware and spyware as well.
Most often, rootkits remain undetected in a victim’s system until they are identified by antivirus and other security tools. Once inside, rootkits can circumvent basic security measures, disable or modify them, and create a backdoor in their cyber security that grants them permanent access to their computer and network.

Uncovering the Secrets of Rootkits

Uncovering the Secrets of Rootkits

What Spyware Can Do to You?

Spyware is a type of malware that installs without the user’s consent and collects data on their computer activities. It can be used to monitor online movements, display unwanted advertisements, or even steal sensitive information.
Three main types of spyware exist: tracking cookies, system monitors, and keyloggers. Each has a distinct purpose and can be difficult to detect.
Tracking Cookies – Tracking cookies are small files placed on your device by a website to monitor online activities. They’re often used for marketing purposes and may be set up to target users based on demographics or interests.
They can collect personal information, such as your address, phone number, email, and social media accounts. This data may then be sold to advertisers and other parties for a profit.
Information captured by this device can be used to commit other crimes, such as identity theft and fraud. This could have a tremendous impact on your reputation if you’re a business owner or have financial transactions that involve credit cards and other personal details.
Spyware can be spread via various methods, such as malicious email attachments, social engineering (phishing), and exploit-based distribution via servers and infected computers. This may make it difficult to distinguish crimeware from other forms of malware like internet worms or hacking attempts.
Spyware can be a major drain on system resources, taking up processor power, RAM, disk space, and network traffic. This may result in slow performance, crashes or other performance issues.

What Spyware Can Do to You?

What Spyware Can Do to You?

Ransomware’s Growing Threat: What Can You Do?

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that prevents users from accessing their computers until they pay a ransom to unlock them. This method has become one of the most common ways cybercriminals extract money from their victims.
Though this type of malware has been around for some time, it remains a major threat to companies and individuals alike. Criminals use it to lock people out of their computers and may even encrypt files on an organization’s network.
That is why it’s essential to educate yourself about ransomware and what steps to take if you think you have been affected. The first step is to avoid opening emails or clicking links from unknown sources. Furthermore, installing software that blocks malicious sites and stops viruses from invading your computer can be beneficial.
Once your antivirus software has been installed, run a full scan to make sure no more malware remains on your computer. If it does, take immediate steps to eliminate it.
Another way to protect against ransomware is through data backups. A backup should contain copies of all files on your system and be stored offsite and encrypted so that cybercriminals cannot destroy it.
If your files cannot be restored from backup, there may be other options to recover them. The most popular is paying the attacker a substantial sum of money; however, this comes with its own set of risks.
Ransomware will become more and more prevalent in 2021, with many attackers targeting enterprise corporations. These organizations typically contain vast amounts of personal and business data on their systems – making them prime targets for ransomware gangs who use it to demand money from victims and steal data.

Ransomware's Growing Threat: What Can You Do?

Ransomware’s Growing Threat: What Can You Do?

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