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Uncovering the Truth: Cyber Security Zero Trust

By Tom Seest

Is Your Data Safe? Exploring the Concept Of Cyber Security Zero Trust

At BestCybersecurityNews, we help entrepreneurs, solopreneurs, young learners, and seniors learn more about cybersecurity.

Due to the rapid expansion of digital transformation, remote work and hybrid networks, and increasingly sophisticated threats from nation-states and malicious actors, IT leaders require a new approach to cybersecurity.
A zero trust security framework is one way to accomplish this objective. It requires constant vigilance in order to guarantee only authorized personnel and devices have access to sensitive data and systems.

Is Your Data Safe? Exploring the Concept Of Cyber Security Zero Trust

Is Your Data Safe? Exploring the Concept Of Cyber Security Zero Trust

Who Holds the Keys to Your Cyber Security? Identity & Access Management Explained

Identity & Access Management, or IAM, is an integral element of any cyber security zero trust strategy. It simplifies security and compliance management by providing more efficient identification, verification and authorization administration. Moreover, IAM helps reduce costs by eliminating unnecessary expenditures associated with maintaining the security of your data and networks.
In a world of cyber security, zero trust, Identity, and Access Management (IAM) is designed to safeguard critical enterprise data from unauthorized users and applications. This includes ensuring users and devices are authenticated when accessing sensitive data or networks, decreasing the risk of breaches caused by unauthorized entry.
IAM can assist your organization in fulfilling regulatory obligations by demonstrating that you have implemented a security system that restricts user access based on need-to-know. Doing this helps minimize fines and penalties related to data protection regulations.
Another critical feature of IAM is its capacity to create situational awareness across your entire network and infrastructure. This is essential for detecting threats, managing them effectively, and limiting customer and business damage. You can monitor activity on endpoints, mobile devices, public/private cloud systems, IoT/OT devices – everything!
Furthermore, IAM provides real-time alerts that monitor the activities of your network and infrastructure and alert you when a cybersecurity threat is entering. This enables you to take swift action and mitigate the issue before it escalates into a major issue.
Finally, IAM can assist in the implementation of a more secure and efficient zero trust architecture by automating many laborious steps. This reduces operational complexity for security teams, alleviates staffing shortages and enhances work efficiency.
IAM is essential for implementing a zero-trust architecture and can also assist in crafting an efficient transition plan. To achieve success, prioritize which assets and processes need prioritizing first, then craft policies on how these will be managed and secured going forward. Once you have an organized view of what needs attention first, it’s time to begin deploying your new security solutions.

Who Holds the Keys to Your Cyber Security? Identity & Access Management Explained

Who Holds the Keys to Your Cyber Security? Identity & Access Management Explained

Is Your Data Truly Secure? Unleashing the Power of Encryption

Data encryption shields sensitive information from being read by hackers, even while in transit across networks. It plays a significant role in cyber security’s zero-trust philosophy, which requires that access to network resources be controlled and authorized based on policies.
Cryptographic techniques, such as symmetric and asymmetric encryption, are employed to safeguard data both at rest and in motion. This helps shield against ransomware and malware attacks which use stolen passwords to break into computer systems and steal sensitive information.
Another essential feature of data encryption is the use of strong cryptographic keys to protect confidential data. These keys should be managed, rotated, and deleted to guarantee no one else has them and only those who need them can decrypt them.
Encryption is also used to restrict who has access to certain files or data and who they can view them. It helps guard against employees downloading malicious documents onto their work devices.
Even with these tools, it is still necessary to monitor and log every attempt to access a company’s sensitive data – including when and how. This can be accomplished using various technologies like network monitoring, intrusion detection systems, and log management programs.
This can assist in detecting when a device is being stolen or lost, and whether it has been compromised by hackers. It also helps prevent data breaches and business disruptions.
Data encryption can also help restrict access to data, particularly when employees are working remotely and don’t require direct contact with the files they require. This can be an efficient way of implementing a data protection policy without impeding productivity or hindering collaboration.
Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for new ways to compromise organizations, and a robust zero trust approach can be an effective defense against these attacks. To guarantee effective protection, several key components must be in place such as multi-factor authentication, endpoint protection and microsegmentation. These measures help shield organizations against today’s most sophisticated cyberattacks while granting only those individuals who need access to certain information permission to do so.

Is Your Data Truly Secure? Unleashing the Power of Encryption

Is Your Data Truly Secure? Unleashing the Power of Encryption

Is Your Device Secure? Exploring Zero Trust Enrollment

Device Enrollment is the process of identifying, managing and deploying corporate-owned devices. Through Microsoft Intune’s company portal, organizations can enroll devices owned by their organization in Intune and manage them with your Microsoft Intune policy. This approach has become popular for organizations looking to strengthen their security posture as well as simplify device enrollment for IT Admins.
Enrolling with Intune uses an anonymized device identifier to protect the identity of employees and their devices from MDM access. This identifier is unique to each licensed user, and remains active during enrollment; if it expires or is removed, a new identifier is created. By doing this, MDM cannot access device-identifying information like serial numbers, UDIDs or IMEIs.
Furthermore, during device enrollment, Intune automatically labels devices as personally owned. This classification helps you quickly identify those devices for which you require additional control and visibility.
This category encompasses kiosk and point of sale (POS) devices, dedicated mobile workstations, shared utility computers, as well as personal or bring-your-own-devices (BYOD). With Intune you can manage these devices using Mobile Application Management (MAM), which gives you control over the apps installed on each device.
You can rely on the Device Enrollment Program, which enables IT Admins to supervise devices remotely and simplify initial setup by eliminating time-consuming steps required for prepping iOS, iPadOS, and tvOS devices for use. With supervision you have control over applications and settings from within your MDM.
Data obtained can help you more accurately track, identify and monitor devices to detect if they have been compromised. Furthermore, it helps prevent unauthorized installation of apps and other security holes.
It is essential to comprehend that zero trust requires an ongoing strategy. Not having a plan in place can hinder productivity and expose security holes in your infrastructure. Therefore, it’s best to implement zero trust gradually and ensure all security steps are completed correctly.

Is Your Device Secure? Exploring Zero Trust Enrollment

Is Your Device Secure? Exploring Zero Trust Enrollment

Are You Practicing Network Segmentation for Optimal Cyber Security?

Network segmentation is an effective means of decreasing the network attack surface and restricting lateral movement of attackers in case of a breach. This technology blocks off access to vulnerable systems while restricting bandwidth use by traffic. Furthermore, admins have the power to shape traffic in ways that optimize performance and simplify compliance processes.
As the attack surface widens, it is increasingly essential to find a secure way of blocking off access to sensitive data and systems that could compromise an organization’s security. One critical element of cyber security zero trust is network segmentation – an essential best practice but one which may prove challenging to implement in many complex environments.
Traditionally, firewalls were the only means of creating network segmentation. However, modern approaches like micro-segmentation and software-defined networking (SDN) offer new methods for controlling and enforcing security policies at the application or workload level without interfering with business operations. For instance, Akamai Guardicore Segmentation makes it easy to identify data based on its content, context, and behavior, including the ability to automate network segmentation policy enforcement.
Network segmentation offers another advantage by decreasing the number of hosts on a network, which improves performance by allowing latency-sensitive and high-priority traffic to bypass congested broadcast domains. By segmenting traffic into different broadcast domains, you can also prioritize it using Quality of Service rules.
Finally, network segmentation helps protect from insider attacks. It blocks hackers from accessing vital systems by restricting their access to users’ credentials and allowing only those with permission to use those resources. This prevents malicious email attachments or unauthorized files from reaching remote locations, as well as safeguarding data transferred between distant locations.
Network segmentation can help enforce the Policy of Least Privilege, an integral element of the zero-trust model. By restricting user access to critical systems, network segmentation focuses security efforts on those individuals who require them for work-related tasks.
Network segmentation is not a mandatory best practice, but it is becoming more widely used to prevent access to malicious devices and data while improving network performance and reducing compliance costs. While achieving and implementing network segmentation can be challenging with the right approach, it has proven to offer significant rewards.

Are You Practicing Network Segmentation for Optimal Cyber Security?

Are You Practicing Network Segmentation for Optimal Cyber Security?

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